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  #51  
Old February 13, 2009, 12:35 PM
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I agree that we desperately need to resolve the power and electricity situation in the country.
It is crippling our society and economy. Its only february and the load shedding already started.
I can only imagine we would have to (again) go through this summer.

I'm all for nuclear powered energy. We do supposedly have a massive reserve of uranium and hence can utilise our own resource.

But one thing that worries me from this current report is that they want to build a 1000MW power plant. To me, that is too little, too unadequate at a high cost.

Using a term we use in shipping industry all the time, "Subject to all going well", lets say we built this thing in 5 years. But if we can carry on even with this current economic progression, our demand for electricity will also increase substentially. If im not mistaken, our current production is (approx) 4000 MW against a demand of 5000 MW. And surely both the demand and the supply will rise in the coming years.

Offcourse the govt will employ other means to increase the productivity and supply of electricity, but i believe we should, if we ever do built a nuclear powerplant, we ought to build it with a bigger capacity. 1000MW would be too insignificant in 20 years time.
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  #52  
Old February 13, 2009, 01:16 PM
FagunerAgun FagunerAgun is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabz
I agree that we desperately need to resolve the power and electricity situation in the country.
But one thing that worries me from this current report is that they want to build a 1000MW power plant. To me, that is too little, too unadequate at a high cost.
The last caretaker government negotiated successfully with IAEA and increased the nuke power plant capacity from 1000MW to 1500MW.

First we need two hunks of them to satisfy Dhaka and Chittagong, then they can be built all over the country to avoid our very poor and fragile delivery system.

God bless our country and peace upon our evolutionarily revolutionary politicians.
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  #53  
Old February 15, 2009, 06:26 AM
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http://www.bdnews24.com/details.php?...3&cid=2&aoth=1
Quote:
Dhaka, Feb 15 (bdnews24.com) – China will fully cooperate with Bangladesh in its bid to set up a nuclear power plant, the Chinese ambassador said Sunday.

"We welcome the Bangladeshi side to communicate on this issue," Zheng Qingdian said at a press conference at the Dhaka Reporters' Unity auditorium in the city.

Bangladesh and China had signed an agreement on peaceful use of nuclear energy in 2005.

He also said in recent years the two countries have seen closer and wider exchange and cooperation in political, economic, military and cultural areas as well as people-to-people relations.

"Sino-Bangladesh relation has become the model which demonstrates how the countries of different social systems and cultural backgrounds harmoniously interact," added the outgoing Chinese envoy.

Zheng presented his credentials to the president as the Chinese ambassador in March, 2007.

He said China had no intention to pursue trade surplus and wanted to strengthen business ties with Bangladesh.

He hoped Bangladesh would take measures to increase its export to China.

China is looking forward to expanding cooperation with Bangladesh, specially in agriculture, education, ICT and communications.

"China would also maintain its support for Bangladesh in international and regional efforts," the ambassador said.

Touching on the issue of a road link Bangladesh to the Chinese province of Kunming, he said his government was serious about it since it would facilitate trade among countries in the region.

On Bangladesh's dispute over maritime boundaries with Myanmar, a close China ally, the Chinese diplomat evaded a direct answer.
"Any difference of opinion should be resolved by all parties concerned sitting together," he said.

Zheng declined comments on such issues as the US proposal to help Bangladesh secure its sea borders and Bangladesh giving transit facilities to India to carry goods.
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  #54  
Old February 20, 2009, 07:35 AM
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we are gonna have a nuke boomb soon? good!
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  #55  
Old April 3, 2009, 04:20 AM
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Seems like the govt is heading towards the right direction in certain areas.
Last few days, the news on Nuclear Energy is back with the arrival of high powered Russian representatives to establish Nuclear Power Plant in Bangladesh.

It is still very early stage, but at least its really good to see something is being done to met what is arguably the most important factor in our economic growth.

Flwg is from Bdnews24.com

================================================== ===========

Dhaka, Moscow draft nuclear MoU

Dhaka, Apr 2 (bdnews24.com)--A Russian minister will visit Bangladesh later this month to sign a memorandum of understanding on building nuclear power plants in this energy-starved country.

Senior officials from the two countries ended three days of "useful" talks in Dhaka Thursday and said they had already drafted the MoU.

"We'll now await clearance from the higher authorities," M M Neazuddin, who led the Bangladesh team to the talks, told bdnews24.com. Once the MoU was okayed, he said, further steps would be taken.

Neazuddin, a joint secretary at the science and ICT ministry, would not give further details.

But Dhaka officials familiar with the negotiations say the two sides discussed the possibility of setting up two 1000-mw units.

The talks did not cover the source of funding or financing terms.

The Dhaka officials said the Russians were not too keen to discuss financing at this stage. "Let's sign the MoU first and then we'll sort out the financing issues," a Russian official was quoted to have told his counterparts.

The host officials hinted that Russia was interested to lend the money needed to build the plants on easy terms. "It is unlikely they would consider giving us grants," one official said.

The loan negotiations will be handled by the Economic Relations Division.

Russia, a global leader in nuclear technology, has supplied as many as 65 plants to Iran, India, China, Armenia, Ukraine, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Finland, Bulgaria and Germany.

Last year, it supplied 10 nuclear power plants to different countries.

The Russians are now working on 11 power plants all over the world.

The idea of a nuclear power plant in the north of Bangladesh (Rooppur, Pabna) was mooted way back in 1961.

Currently, 439 power plants are producing 16 percent of total electricity around the world.

A two-member high-level team of Russian nuclear experts by Vladimir Averkiev, head of international co-operation at Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation, arrived in Dhaka Monday for the three-day talks.

Nikolay Poznyakov, head of external affairs of International relations department, was the other member.

Liakat Ali, acting chairman of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, project director of nuclear power plant Shawkat Akbar, former chairman of the Commission Shafiqul Islam and director of BCSIR Rafiqul Islam were in the Bangladesh delegation.

Source: http://www.bdnews24.com/details.php?cid=4&id=80541&hb=2
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  #56  
Old April 3, 2009, 04:56 PM
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Isn't it risky considering our inadequate security measures?
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  #57  
Old April 3, 2009, 05:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarWolf
Isn't it risky considering our inadequate security measures?
or considering how densely populated bangladesh is. And how efficient our emergency fire and rescue services are (Bashundhara anyone?) We'd be having lakhs of cancer and radiation-caused deaths with a mini-Chernobyl!

In my eyes this is another White Elephant prestige project by the BD govt costing big bucks. Last time we had Khamba, now this. Yes we need electricity, but we need it safe, clean and efficient. I fail to see how one 1000MW nuclear plant gets overridden by several smaller natural gas, wind or solar power plants located close to their market. A lot of our power crises would be solved if power production was decentralised into small plants giving citywide power. I feel the pricing and distribution of electricty would be more equitable for the country that way. Gram bangla doesnt consume most of the electricity, plus rural solar energy projects are already doing a lot of good work for those areas.
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  #58  
Old April 3, 2009, 06:43 PM
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We should invest more on solar power plants. Across our long costal area wind based power plants can be a cheap yet good solution. Just need to utilize our Union Parishad effectively to maintain those plants.
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  #59  
Old April 4, 2009, 03:36 AM
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Why do we try to undermine our capability of securing a power plant? In that case both Ind and Pak nuke plants are even more at risk !!

Wind, Solar are good for domestic use in hard to reach areas, we don't have enough land space to block for these plants on commercial basis. nuke is our ultimate solution. At least as per current products, but in future they might be able to invent ways of producing more energy from smaller pannels, that might be thought at that time.

But I am a bit depressed with 1000 mega capacity, it could have been atleast 5000 to start with. Hope they could expand in later. Atleast we don't have a political difference on the issue in principle, that's a good sign.
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  #60  
Old April 4, 2009, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarWolf
We should invest more on solar power plants. Across our long costal area wind based power plants can be a cheap yet good solution. Just need to utilize our Union Parishad effectively to maintain those plants.
Dude, None of the renewable energy source besides Hydroelecric Power plants is Capable of producing sufficient energy for the need of the masses. Wind farms and Solar can be good alternate source but u need a MASSIVEEEE wind farm to produce close to 200MW ( 1000MW is just unimaginable using alternative sources). Same goes for Solar. Bangladesh is a small country and such alternatives are not really viable. Plus both these energy depends on factors that is beyond our control. So these energy is not the answer for industrialized country. Our only alternative is Nuclear or Coal when we run out of gas. :-(

Hydroelectric would have been the best option if only we had a niagra falls :-(. Hence Nuclear.
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  #61  
Old April 4, 2009, 11:06 AM
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having large nuclear power in a densely populated country like BD is a very risky proposition. let me reason why

1)BD has no uranium reserve and will have to buy enriched uranium from other countries at high prices. uranium prices are expected to go through the roof in the next 15-20 years.

2)nuclear power plants require massive investment upfront and even the maintenance will require setting up of considerable support institutions, which would make economic sense only if the govt goes for much larger programs than 1000 MW or even 1500 MW ones

3)country-wise BD is one of the luckier ones who don't need to depend on nuclear power, solar power, coastal (tidal) power and small hydro projects all over the country would be a fantastic alternative with additional benefits to fishing, iriigation and flood control rather than a white elephant like nuclear power.
Due to its geographical location both solar and wind power have tremendous potential in bangladesh.

4)a large nuclear power plant would be like putting all your eggs in one basket and if that fails(and history of such large projects don't give much cause for hope) you lose a large chunk of your energy budget, much better to spread it around in smaller alternative energy generation units all over the country, that would also generate much needed employment and bolster the local economies.

5)you need to think long term, what about where you would dispose of the toxic nuclear waste ? the cost of disposal of nuclear waste is astronomical even if you do get a piece of land to do it. the way france does it (dumping in oceans in sealed containers) won't be allowed for too long in the future.
don't think BD has a sparsely populated place where it can do that, it would be a huge problem if not thought of at the start.

6) and then the ever present danger to life, even without chernobyl like incidents, even regular running of nuclear plants are harmful to the local environment, reactions include high cases of cancer, genetic disorders, problems with reproduction in both human and animals, low crop yield, so on and so forth.
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  #62  
Old April 4, 2009, 01:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neel Here
having large nuclear power in a densely populated country like BD is a very risky proposition. let me reason why

1)BD has no uranium reserve and will have to buy enriched uranium from other countries at high prices. uranium prices are expected to go through the roof in the next 15-20 years.

2)nuclear power plants require massive investment upfront and even the maintenance will require setting up of considerable support institutions, which would make economic sense only if the govt goes for much larger programs than 1000 MW or even 1500 MW ones

3)country-wise BD is one of the luckier ones who don't need to depend on nuclear power, solar power, coastal (tidal) power and small hydro projects all over the country would be a fantastic alternative with additional benefits to fishing, iriigation and flood control rather than a white elephant like nuclear power.
Due to its geographical location both solar and wind power have tremendous potential in bangladesh.

4)a large nuclear power plant would be like putting all your eggs in one basket and if that fails(and history of such large projects don't give much cause for hope) you lose a large chunk of your energy budget, much better to spread it around in smaller alternative energy generation units all over the country, that would also generate much needed employment and bolster the local economies.

5)you need to think long term, what about where you would dispose of the toxic nuclear waste ? the cost of disposal of nuclear waste is astronomical even if you do get a piece of land to do it. the way france does it (dumping in oceans in sealed containers) won't be allowed for too long in the future.
don't think BD has a sparsely populated place where it can do that, it would be a huge problem if not thought of at the start.

6) and then the ever present danger to life, even without chernobyl like incidents, even regular running of nuclear plants are harmful to the local environment, reactions include high cases of cancer, genetic disorders, problems with reproduction in both human and animals, low crop yield, so on and so forth.
1) Prices of all kinds of fuel are expected to go through the roof...There is still enough Uranium in this earth to sustain for another 70+ years taking into account the growth rates. Same cannot be said about other natural resources that can generate power.

2) Nuclear power is actually the cheapest power in this world right now. The cost for setting up is expensive but generationg power is not. The raw material is still cheaper than Crude oil or coal.

3)Solar and Wind power can only support small housing projects in rural areas. For industrial power requirements u need massive power that can only be sustained using Nuclear, Coal or Gas. Provided no coal or gas reserves in Bd, nuclear is the cheapest in terms of importing.

4) The gov is considering setting up two 1000 MW power stations. Setting up small power plants all over the country is still expensive and the fuel is not abundant to generate the same power.

5) Waste management is the least of the concern for a nuclear power plant. To provide jobs to the growing work force u need indstries and industries need power...there is just no other alternative.

6)Treated properly the dangers are minimal. Most of the cost associated with setting up the plant is based on creating the best safety mechanism.
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  #63  
Old April 4, 2009, 03:15 PM
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Have to agree with Neel here. Being in Bangladesh gives you the perspective again on how inefficient, risky and problematic the systems in many forms of infrastructure are here. One thing we must keep in mind is that there are IMMENSE leakages and wastage in electricity and gas distribution in Bangladesh which is a major contributor to our shortfall currently.

Despite Nuclear power being the cheapest form of producing energy, a 1000-1500MW plant still remains a White Elephant. Much improvements in Bangladesh's power situation depends on equitable power distribution, smaller scale power generation projects, and cutting down on "system loss".

Every day most large factories in Bangladesh rely on the gas supply to fire their own power plant, as PDB service is so bad. BERC has been established and they really should get into the business of introducing competing private Power distribution and generation companies - they will inevitably all cater to the profitable urban and industrial markets, so there's plenty of room for the existing semi-functioning gas-fired energy stations to cater to the remaining markets. I'm a big proponent of the decentralised power generation system because while I was in Toronto, a measure such as this had been adopted as it was found to offer much greater reliability, flexibility and efficiency than the current cumbersome centralized system.

Large scale hydro-power plants like Kaptai are no longer an option, however tidal and solar power is. The other day there was a report on some news channel that a newly built Windfarm is lying idle somewhere after having had a test run 1 and half years ago due to government not caring to start its operation. This is just another example of the immense wastage of public money on infrastructure that our government continually undertakes and robs us off.

And not just government, even privately we are big wasters of energy in our building designs and utility. Central Air-conditioning, higher ceilings per floor, use of newer efficient machinery and appliances cut down energy consumption significantly. Thank goodness we have already started using 15W energy saving bulbs more in BD. In Gulshan-Banani every apartment building seems to have a Generator burning imported expensive diesel to power the buildings while the electricity is gone. These modern generators dont consume any less fuel if someone upstairs switches off their lights - they'll produce their rated output no matter what! The amount of fuel consumed per building could probably power an extra road had they been used in a neighbourhood power plant.

Building a 1000MW nuclear power plant in light of these is just an eyewash for people. There are deeper structural problems that have to be fixed in tandem. There are also many more safer and diversified alternatives available to Bangladesh for the amount we'll spend on a nuclear plant. The (Opportunity) Costs of such a nuclear plant truly outweigh many of its benefits.

Quote:
5) Waste management is the least of the concern for a nuclear power plant. To provide jobs to the growing work force u need indstries and industries need power...there is just no other alternative.
The above statement in my opinion is a most irresponsible comment. Waste management and concern for well-being of people who will be affected by it, is equally paramount to job creation!
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  #64  
Old April 4, 2009, 04:20 PM
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We don't have to have a uranium reserve for fueling the nuke power plant. You won't be able to enrich it anyway. The safety and waste management is the headache of the Supplying company as a part of the deal and IAEA will also observe the facilities before and after it goes into operation, so we don't have to worry about the inefficiency of the government, that's least affected by it unlike other forms of power generation, where the international monitoring and concerns are less.

Distribution is ofcourse a problem but that doesn't mean that generation is adequate. We have to reduce the system losses, and at the same time generate more power. We also have to get rid of smaller genrators & power plants all over, they are also a large polluting factor and a reason for system losses as well.

There are associated risks of Nuke power and those are all known to the international community, as such may not be a concern. It's no enrichment here, neither a weapons program, so we are taking the least possible risk with nuke for the sake of needed ellectricity, which is absolutely fair. IMO
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  #65  
Old April 4, 2009, 04:45 PM
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1) Prices of all kinds of fuel are expected to go through the roof...There is still enough Uranium in this earth to sustain for another 70+ years taking into account the growth rates. Same cannot be said about other natural resources that can generate power.
last I heard prices of sun rays and winds aren't going anywhere.
same about the reserves !

coming back to this price issue, I think it needs a bit of explanation.

fast developing countries and developed countries alike won't be able to ignore environmental concerns for too long, especially if something like carbon taxes become widespread. if for nothing else, due to future energy crunch alone, countries with no other energy options will have to move towards nuclear power.

that includes countries that currently depend heavily upon coal, like usa, china, india, australia.
can you imagine the uranium demand ? I suggest sir that you look-up the predicted future trends of uranium prices.
the only light seems to be the new thorium based technology the indians are working on which is realistically expected to bear fruit only around 2015 and after.
only if that happens, (and chances are it might not) will there still be affordable uranium in the international market.

Quote:
2) Nuclear power is actually the cheapest power in this world right now. The cost for setting up is expensive but generationg power is not. The raw material is still cheaper than Crude oil or coal.
it's not that simple. cheap to run but NOT cheap to operate.
it doesn't do to compare upfront the cost of setting up a nuclear power plant in say, usa and in BD.
initial costs required for setting up a power plant in a developing country like BD will be much more than that of a heavily industrialised country like usa because they already have much of the common infrastructure in place. (manpower training, grids and so on)
such initial costs can only be economically justified if BD wants to transform its whole energy economy a nuclear based one.
Quote:
3)Solar and Wind power can only support small housing projects in rural areas. For industrial power requirements u need massive power that can only be sustained using Nuclear, Coal or Gas. Provided no coal or gas reserves in Bd, nuclear is the cheapest in terms of importing.
gross misconception.
wherever they are set up, solar and winds farms can be linked to a central grid, distance isn't much of a matter. solar power can be quite effectively used in urban areas if innovatively used.
but I would agree that solar cell technology still has some way to go before maturing as a cost effective technology. wind power on the other hand is already mature.
but I would put more money on small hydro projects. continued in next point.

Quote:
Large scale hydro-power plants like Kaptai are no longer an option, however tidal and solar power is. The other day there was a report on some news channel that a newly built Windfarm is lying idle somewhere after having had a test run 1 and half years ago due to government not caring to start its operation. This is just another example of the immense wastage of public money on infrastructure that our government continually undertakes and robs us off.
ammark bhai, smaller hydel projects might be the best bet.

I doubt if BD has utilised even 25% of its hydel potential.
points in favour of smaller hydro projects :
# most environmentally friendly of all power generation methods. doesn't affect the catchment area as adversely as large hydel projects, a la 3 gorges dam. no pollution to speak of. requires lesser area than wind farms. has additional benefits in terms of irrigation etc etc.
# can be micromanaged to suit the local requirements, much more robust against sudden changes in river behaviour than larger projects. the old eggs and basket analogy.

Quote:
5) Waste management is the least of the concern for a nuclear power plant. To provide jobs to the growing work force u need indstries and industries need power...there is just no other alternative.
not really. virtually every industry requires a good water source.
what better way than to set up the industry upstream and the hydel project nearby downstream ? perfect solution !!
you can even match the project size to fit the industry requirements.

a combination of mainly renewables and to a smaller extent old non-renewables like gas and coal would serve the economy quite well.
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  #66  
Old April 4, 2009, 04:51 PM
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to add to that,
nuclear power makes great sense for countries that don't have any other option, but for countries that do, it's better not to go that way, at least not until we have safe fusion based power generation !!

Quote:
6)Treated properly the dangers are minimal. Most of the cost associated with setting up the plant is based on creating the best safety mechanism.
if only it were that easy !

Quote:
We don't have to have a uranium reserve for fueling the nuke power plant. You won't be able to enrich it anyway. The safety and waste management is the headache of the Supplying company as a part of the deal and IAEA will also observe the facilities before and after it goes into operation, so we don't have to worry about the inefficiency of the government, that's least affected by it unlike other forms of power generation, where the international monitoring and concerns are less.
if that works out well and fine. I won't take a chance needlessly when alternatives are available(I think). if I'm wrong, undoubtedly nukes are the next based thing !
that's all.
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  #67  
Old April 4, 2009, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Puck
a defence strategy based on nuclear weapons can have two effects. it would offer grounds for reducing the size of the army. i am all for that.
I don't know why we even bother with an army. Surrounded by the most powerful armies in the world its not like we stand a chance. As for nukes, we can't be trusted. Not to mention we are no way near as capable.
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  #68  
Old April 4, 2009, 06:06 PM
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if that works out well and fine. I won't take a chance needlessly when alternatives are available(I think). if I'm wrong, undoubtedly nukes are the next based thing !
While the entire world is moving towards Nuke for clean and efficient energy, it won't be wise for us to be scared & be left behind. If that doesn't work, there is no option left, gotto have faith on the internationally proven systems. I'm confident that IAEA is pretty serious and efficient at it.

Don't really see any feasible industrial alternative. Small scale private sector ellectric generation at the moment is a huge loss (due to corruption) for the government and inefficient as well. Solar, wind and hydro are not so viable alternatives.
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Old April 5, 2009, 01:35 AM
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Solar, wind and hydro are not so viable alternatives.
why do you think so ? technology of the last two have matured quite well. countries like germany denmark etc are going wind powered in a big way.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_po..._of_wind_power

wind power is probably the fastest growing energy type these days.
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Old April 5, 2009, 02:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neel Here
why do you think so ? technology of the last two have matured quite well. countries like germany denmark etc are going wind powered in a big way.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind_po..._of_wind_power

wind power is probably the fastest growing energy type these days.
Buddy, u think it is possible to generate 1000MW + power using solar and wind power? Plus both the technology depends on nature, u think an industry would risk their output hoping if the sun will shine or the windy conditions.

Grameen shakti in Bangladesh is trying to supply power to rural areas using solar power. That is viable because of the small power required on home to home basis or small business installation. Coastal belt in bangladesh may be ideal for wind energy but there is still much needed resaerch that needs to be done.

A good alternative source in Bangladesh can be biogas plant. We can use the enormous garbage to generate power...even then, a very optimistic figure would be around 50 MW. nothing more....
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  #71  
Old April 5, 2009, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by ammark
The above statement in my opinion is a most irresponsible comment. Waste management and concern for well-being of people who will be affected by it, is equally paramount to job creation!
My comment was not properly worded. I meant that it is not a big deal to dump nuclear waste in a safe manner.
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  #72  
Old April 5, 2009, 03:26 PM
FagunerAgun FagunerAgun is offline
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  #73  
Old April 11, 2009, 10:41 AM
WarWolf WarWolf is offline
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Bro HereWeGo....please answer my simple one question....
How secure would you feel when you have a nuclear power station in your country near your home and you have the lowest standard of security system in your country as of now?
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  #74  
Old April 11, 2009, 11:21 AM
HereWeGo HereWeGo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarWolf
Bro HereWeGo....please answer my simple one question....
How secure would you feel when you have a nuclear power station in your country near your home and you have the lowest standard of security system in your country as of now?
I trust in our armies ability to guard any nuclear installations. If Pakistan can have a nuclear plant with a 1000 times worse terror sitution than I don see any problem with Bangladesh. I also trust International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on making absolutely certain that all the proper precaution is taken in terms of making the structure secure so that no untoward incident like chernobyl is probable.

Finally my grandma's house is located in Pabna (shadhupara). I visit their everytime I visit Bangladesh.. and I will still feel safe with the nuclear power plant at rooppur.

However I am willing to accept alternative power like solar and wind neday over nuclear if u can find a way to generate 1000MW..but till than I am a supporter f nuclear power plants...

Last edited by HereWeGo; April 11, 2009 at 11:26 AM..
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  #75  
Old May 13, 2009, 10:39 AM
PoorFan PoorFan is offline
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Wed, May 13th, 2009 3:48 pm BdST
Dial 2324 from your mobile for latest news
Maruf Mallick
bdnews24.com energy correspondent

Dhaka, May 13 (bdnews24.com)—Bangladesh and Russia signed a memorandum of understanding on Wednesday on installation of a nuclear power plant.

Chairman of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission Dr. Mosharaf Hossain and deputy director general of Russian State Atomic Energy Corporation (Rosatom) N N Spasskiy signed the deal aimed at peaceful utilization of nuclear energy, the first step towards the installation.

State minister for science Yafes Osman and prime minister's energy affairs adviser Tawfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury and high officials from both sides were present.

Osman said in the signing ceremony that was an outcome of series of discussion and that the understanding was a step to take things further.

"One of our expert teams will visit Russia. Then we will know the cost of power plant."

"We are planning to install of 600-1000 megawatt power plant."

"We have the same memorandum of uderstanding with the USA and China. We will try to pick the best one," he added.

Spasskiy said, "It is important, because we signed the MoU, it enables us to start working, to start practical cooperation."

"It is a big agreement, framework agreement."

It was absolutely necessary in such a field as the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

"So my great hope is that it enables us to finalise the government procedures on both sides and to proceed to the signature of the agreement as soon as possible," he said.

"The prospect of the cooperation is in the designing and afterwards in the building of a first-ever energy nuclear reactor in your country," the deputy director general added.

"It would also imply a radical change to the situation of electricity in your country."

"Bangladesh for us is not only longstanding friend, it's a strategic partner. Bangladesh is a key player in the region," Spassiky continued.

"I do think that our technology in terms of everything is the best in the world."

He said last December the Russian president signed a new agreement for the construction of four additional nuclear reactors during his visit to India.

"Everywhere we are constructing nuclear reactors."

The deputy director general said they needed to finalise the agreement 'as soon as possible', 'because without the agreement even we cannot talk about certain things'.

He said there options for financing the project. A build-own-operate option is one of them.

Spasskiy led a high-powered delegation of Russia, a global leader in nuclear technology, to Dhaka on Tuesday to sign the deal.

Prime minister Sheikh Hasina provisionally approved the draft MoU, officials said last week.

The draft MoU was finalised in a three-day meeting last month in Dhaka.

Russia did not specify the financial terms which would be settled after the final agreement, said the officials with direct knowledge of the negotiations.

They said Russia was interested to provide loan, probably on easy terms, rather than grant. The Economic Relation Division will settle the financial terms and conditions once the MoU is signed.

Russia supplied 10 nuclear power plants last year and has supplied as many as 65 plants to Iran, India, China, Armenia, Ukraine, Hungary, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Finland, Bulgaria and Germany. Currently it is constructing 11 power plants in countries.

The first initiative to install nuclear power plant in Bangladesh in Rooppur, Pabna was taken in 1961.

Currently 439 power plants are producing 16 percent of total electricity around the world.

China and South Korea also approached Bangladesh to set up nuclear power plant.

bdnews24.com/mrf/bd/1733h.

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Lets move on and real fast! But why only 600 - 1000 MW, not bad for the first time? We need couple of more if we ever to dream industrial development, and 150 million people to feed.
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