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Old June 29, 2013, 05:16 PM
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Zeeshan Zeeshan is offline
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Quote:
1938

The boy who bowled Bradman

A 16-year-old schoolboy made the front pages of the national newspapers when he bowled the greatest batsman of all
Martin Williamson
June 29, 2013
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The <I>Daily Express</I> reports on Don Bradman being bowled by a schoolboy, Paul Brooks, April 21, 1938
Read all about it: Paul Brooks' achievement made the national press in England and Australia © Daily Express
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For bowlers in the 1930s and 1940s there was no greater scalp than that of Don Bradman.
Those who took his wicket dined out on the fact and one, Bill Andrews, who bowled left-arm fast-medium for Somerset, called his otherwise forgettable autobiography The Hand That Bowled Bradman. That Bradman had 202 at the time and all but surrendered his wicket was of no matter; Andrews also used to greet people with "Shake the hand that bowled Bradman". But few who dismissed the Don were as young as Paul Brooks.
In 1938, Bradman was at his peak as a player. He arrived in England in mid-April as captain of Australia and, as was custom, the team stayed the first few days in London to acclimatise, practising at Lord's by day and taking part in official functions by night.
At Lord's the MCC groundstaff were only too happy to act as net bowlers. It made a pleasant change from their usual chores, which included cleaning members' boots and equipment and keeping Lord's swept.
On the chilly morning of April 20 the Australians turned up at Lord's for their first net - for almost half the squad it was the first time they had set eyes on the old ground. The cold was unwelcome but they struggled more with the gloom. One who tried some catching practice told reporters it was like peering through fog.
http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine...ry/645765.html
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The guy you hit? If he got a look at the plates, it won't even take that long. There's no play here. There's no angle, there's no champagne room. I'm not a miracle worker, I'm a janitor. The math on this is simple; the smaller the mess, the easier it is for me to clean up.
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